Myths on Mooting | A Trapped Web

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Are you pulling yourselves back from participating in Moot Court Competitions because of something that your friend or a senior told you? Are you curious about a moot, but don’t have the courage to take it up because of the myths surrounding mooting? Did you join your friend’s moot team as a researcher thinking you won’t need to do anything? Well, you have trapped a web of myths. And, we are here to bust four myths on mooting:

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1. Mooting is only for those who want to practice litigation

Many students refrain from mooting in law schools because they are under the impression that mooting is only for those who are aiming to pursue litigation in future. Well, it is not true. Mooting is very different from litigating before an actual court. Mooting is beneficial for all law students irrespective of the career path, they chose to follow. It aids in improving research skills shoots up your confidence, builds your understanding of the law, helps you widen your network, brush up your speaking skills, etc. The skills that you will learn after participating in a moot court competition are going to help you in any field that you decide to step into in future. Also read, How to Prepare for Oral Rounds in a Moot Court Competition.

Myths on Mooting

2. Researchers have a passive role to play in a moot court competition

At times, teams do not perform well because of an inefficient researcher. This happens because of the myth about how a researcher is a passive team member. This sometimes culminates into researchers coming to the competitions, unprepared. Remember that the judges are not just listening to the speakers but are also observing the general behaviour of your entire team. They do notice how active the researcher is and how well is he coordinating with the speakers. Your overall marks directly or indirectly depend on the demeanour of the researcher. It is not practically possible for the speaker to carry with him all the research points to the dais. (Read: Qualities of a Good Researcher)

At this point, it is the researcher who keeps all the authorities handy with him. His job is to assist the speaker if he gets stuck at a point or is unable to answer any question. Also, the compendium cannot include materials like commentaries, dictionaries, etc. These authorities have to be presented to the judges by the researcher at the right time. The researcher has to be well versed with the memorials. While practising for the oral rounds, it is not only the speakers who require practice, the researcher also has to be taken on board.

Myths on Mooting

3. Mooting is a mere competition and will not help you in your career

Students tend to believe that mooting is just an extra-curricular activity and does not have space in the crucial years of a law student. It is not true. Mooting has an equal role to play in shaping your career. In modern lawyering, very few lawyers are all-rounders. Most lawyers master in a particular area of law only. Nowadays, there are popular moot court competitions in all areas of law. If you are passionate about any particular area of law, then you can opt for moots that are specific to your interest area. Mooting will enhance your understanding of the area better than classroom teaching. You will get an analytical and critical approach to the law Further, these competitions allow you to build a network that can assist you in internship/job opportunities. Also read, Benefits of Mooting

Myths on Mooting

4. Mooting is not for first-year students

As a general practice in law schools, first-year students are discouraged to participate in moot court competitions. Because of this myth, most first-year students don’t get the help that they deserve while preparing for the moot court competitions. Teachers and seniors are reluctant to aid these students.  However, Memo Pundits is here for you and does not discriminate based on your year of study in law school. Remember, if you are ready to work hard, then it doesn’t matter which year you are in.  In fact, since the first-year students do not have a lot of academic pressure, they can invest a major part of their time on mooting. Also read, Guide for First Time Mooters

Now, that you know how you were abiding by a false belief system, take your first step and register for the affordable courses by Memo Pundits– the first mooting school in India. Keep checking the Knowledge Centre for more updates.


About the AuthorYashi Agrawal is a student at Maharashtra National Law University, Nagpur. She is currently holding the post of the Co-Convenor of the Moot court Committee. Ever since she came to know of it, she has been immensely lured by the world of mooting. She also has great experience in writing blogs for law students.

About the EditorShivangi Bajpai is a graduate from National Law University Odisha. As a fresher in law school, she was a part of an online law school magazine called Ergo (lawyergo.com) which was largely a peer-connect platform for students from law fraternity.  She has remarkable research skills and was a researcher in Henry Dunant Moot Court Competition, in her second year of law school.  She considers herself a solution-oriented individual making her an effective problem solver.

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