How to work with a Moot Team?

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Moot Court Competitions are an inherent part of a law student’s college life. We all have at some point of our law-school participated in one. Every Law student has at least once in his/her lives dreamt of winning a Moot Court Competition and bring the trophy home. In this entire process of mooting, an essential part of the Moot Court Competition is choosing a Good Moot Team.

Are you not able to gel well with your moot team? Do you feel over-burdened in your moot team? Are you unhappy with your team’s effort shown in the last moot? Here is your complete guide on choosing Moot Court teams.

1. Do Not Make the Decision Emotionally

Mooting is not an individual phenomenon. When you participate in a Moot Court Competition, you participate as a team and as a result, it is very much essential that all the members of a Moot Court Team remain on the same pedestal. If one fails, it becomes very difficult for the rest of the two to work with the efficiency of the three. We often tend to make a team with our friends. However, it is advised to refrain from taking this decision emotionally. It is always advisable to make your moot team strategically. You must think before asking the person to form a team. (Read: How to Prepare for Oral Rounds in a Moot Court Competition.)

Moot Team

2. Team Up with Dedicated Students

Some of us are too passionate about moot court competitions while there are many students who feel moot court competitions are overrated. Thereby the emotion that you attach with a moot court competition might not be the same that the other person attaches. Therefore it is very essential for you to do homework before asking someone to be your moot court team partner. Be very sure and think very wisely, whether that person will be able to show the same level of dedication as you.

Moot Team

3. Coordinate with Your Team Mates

Sometimes, there might be issues with respect to coordination. In such scenarios, it will be better if give full autonomy to each other to function in their own agencies. This will help build trust and engagement in the team which becomes important in any team collaboration over a long time period. (Read: How to read a Moot Problem?)

Moot Team

4. Be Frank About the Deficiencies

Partnering up with friends for a moot court Competition can be a complicated decision. One might not be satisfied with the work ethics of their friend but risk spoiling a friendship in a situation of conflict. Resultantly, one might avoid bringing up the issue. As a team, everyone should be willing to discuss openly and be frank to each other about the deficiencies that are coming up. This attitude will help in a realistic assessment of deficiencies and provide the scope for improvement. (Read: Qualities of a Good Researcher)

5. Ensure that there is Compatibility

Moreover, a lot of things depend upon your compatibility with the team. If you are compatible with your team, you will be surely able to perform well in moots.  With good compatibility, team members will be able to complement each other to cover the shortcomings of each other. (Read: Important Moot Court Terminologies.)

6. Ensure that the Team Remains Positive

Moot Court Competitions can take a toll on the mental health of the team. It is imperative that you continue to maintain a positive outlook and not lose faith. Your stress level affects your efficiency and thus, remaining positive throughout the course of preparation helps. Take time outs and breaks, if required but never lose hope.

If you are stressed out, take a coffee break now. And, do not forget to subscribe to the affordable courses by your favourite mentor: Memo Pundits. Happy Mooting!

About the AuthorAkshat Tiwari is Student at NMIMS Kirit P Mehta School of Law, Mumbai. He likes mooting and is keen of doing research work. 

About the EditorShivangi Bajpai is a graduate from National Law University Odisha. As a fresher in law school, she was a part of an online law school magazine called Ergo (lawyergo.com) which was largely a peer-connect platform for students from law fraternity.  She has remarkable research skills and was a researcher in Henry Dunant Moot Court Competition, in her second year of law school.  She considers herself a solution-oriented individual making her an effective problem solver.

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Lipi Garg

Lipi Garg

Lipi is the Assistant Publishing Editor of Memo Pundits. For help in publishing details of any event, please email at lipi.garg@memopundits.com

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