Inside NUALS’ initiative to use Gaming elements in Law Curriculum

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Are you confused about what gamification means? Let us explain. It applies to gaming devices and narratives in contexts where games are not used. Example: RPG refers to role-playing games. This same role-playing can be used in an ongoing class exercise.

For Example, A junior student is asked to play the role of an advocate in a lower court. 

He is given additional assignments on different subjects and asked to collect evidence regarding a particular fictional case. In her final year, he/she will be asked to argue the case before a fictional Apex Court, using the oratory trial skills she has sharpened throughout the 3 or 5 years of her course. 

It is similar to mooting competitions and mock trials because it provides lawyers with a way to practice their skills before stepping out into the real world and arguing real-life cases. The difference is that mooting competitions end in 2 or 3 days no matter what, whereas this is just like a real case. There is no such time limit. For example: in moots, you will have a certain number of minutes to present your case before the judge, but in courts, it will span out over several months or even years. 

Gamification expert, Manu Melvin Joy, Assistant Professor of School of Management Studies (SMS) and at Cochin University of Science and Technology (CUSAT) will develop the course with his experience and knowledge.

Before the CUSAT Vice-Chancellor, K. N. Madhusoodanan, and in the presence of K C Sunny, a formal agreement was recently signed between Manu and Mini S., faculty of NUALS, at CUSAT.

Professor K.C. Sunny said that this move was inspired by something Sr. Advocate Fali Nariman had referred to, during his keynote address at a national seminar on Reforms of Legal Education.

This unique initiative by NUALS is set to revamp legal education in India. Hope you are excited as we are to see this come to fruition soon. Check out our article on NLU v. Non-NLUs.

But before one delves into these gamification competitions, one must do a Moot Court competition first to acquire the minimum skills required to ace such competitions. 

Are you a beginner, too? Don’t worry we got you. 

Refer to our flagship courses on Memorial making and oral argumentation by clicking here and here, respectively. 

All the best for all your future endeavours! 

About the Author: Anjali Baskar is from the School of Law, Christ University. Her interests in law include public policy, ADR/ODR, criminal law, IPR/Entertainment law, etc.

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Lipi Garg

Lipi Garg

Lipi is the Assistant Publishing Editor of Memo Pundits. For help in publishing details of any event, please email at lipi.garg@memopundits.com

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