How to use LinkedIn effectively (for Law Students)? Read on to find out

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You have created a Linkedin account. You fill in the basics like your name, contact number, and start waiting for the opportunities to pour in. Need some tips on how to make Linkedin work for you? Read ahead!

1. Fill up all the parts of your profile

We get it. You might be too lazy to go check all papers you’ve published, credential IDs from certificates you have gotten from courses, achievements, etc. But these are essential for employers to notice you. Take 2 hours out of your busy schedule to diligently fill up all this information and your experiences. Trust me, this will help you shortly and it’s one time! After that, all you have to do is update your latest achievements regularly. Use a professional photo for your profile. This helps authenticate your identity.

2. Post regularly on LinkedIn

 It will take some time to go beyond that awkwardness but instead of first posting anything, you can try engaging with people in your network – for example – if someone has posted something, engage with them through comments. As our CEO Anant Gupta has said, like and comment on things which you feel are good, etc. Don’t be stingy with your likes or comments. Be more giving on Linkedin. 

3. Post about your achievements

Some are not interested in looking through your whole profile, so whenever you complete an internship, be sure to attach the certificate and your experience in 1-2 paragraphs and tag the organization/firm. This will help you stand out. As a bonus, star the post to your featured column so it shows up at the beginning of your profile. Don’t spam people’s feeds with posts to gain followers because that makes people unfollow you. 

4. If you do anything minutely significant, share that as a public post

Like an internship experience or the sort. The catch here is the caption. Make it insightful by telling a concept of law or what you learned (so that a potential recruiter knows what you now know by reading your caption). I would recommend you to post something when you LinkedIn found it insightful and would add value. Instead, write a post about 3 things: 1. Thoughts on an experience that was useful to you, 2. Thoughts on a judgment or an opinion on some interesting subject matter, 3. Skills learned from internship and course. Try to maintain a positive tone.

5. Increase your engagement

If you are interested in the work someone does, connect with them no matter if you know them personally or not. Never shy away from sending a connection request on LinkedIn. If you find someone interesting, try to instantly follow them and send a connection request. You can also start interacting with people through your news feed, which leads to improvements in your score.

6. Fill up the ‘About’ Section 

Many people don’t write it, but you can use it to list your interested fields of law and show off your creative writing. Come up with a very pertinent ‘about’ yourself column on your profile. People do read it.

9. Request and give recommendations

7. Be descriptive about the courses and internships you have done

Write a description for each of your internship experiences in 1-2 lines. This shows the recruiter how involved you were in the internship. Put your LinkedIn URL in the internship application mails you sent out. Sure, you might have put it at the top of your CV, but most recruiters will miss it, so also put it in the body of your email in bold.

8. Show that you’re open to work after picking your interests

Eg. If your interest is in legal writing and research, Linkedin will show you companies/firms where they are looking to fill vacancies in those positions. 

Request and give recommendations

9. Request and give recommendations

Recommendations can be requested by clicking on “More” next to one of your connections’ profiles. This makes you look professional and helps give you endorsements on various skills. Make sure it is from someone who you have worked with personally, so they can highlight specific things about you. 

 

Request and give recommendations

Go ahead and hone your skills with new experiences and click here to know more about Linkedin profile-building.

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Lipi Garg

Lipi Garg

Lipi is the Publishing Editor of Memo Pundits. For help in publishing details of any event, please email at lipi.garg@memopundits.com

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